What do you feel looking at this silent Gif?

Who I am
Elia Tabuenca García
@eliatabuencagarcía

Look at a picture on a PC screen and hear a sound. This test went around the world and highlighted synaesthesia. It is not a question of the figure of speech but of a very particular neurological condition that is still little known and recognized. Affected people hear sounds even where none are produced. And that's what happens to some people looking at this gif



Don't store avocado like this: it's dangerous

Look at a picture on a PC screen and hear a sound. This test went around the world and highlighted synaesthesia. It is not about the rhetorical figure we learned in school but about a very particular neurological condition that is still little known and recognized. Affected people hear sounds even where none are produced. And that's what happens to some people looking at this gif.



A tweet shared by Scottish scientist Lisa DeBruine has rekindled the spotlight on this issue. Anyone who observes this gif and hears a noise is affected by synaesthesia. One in five people can feel it, which shows that it is not a rare condition but rather a common one.

Take a look at this GIF too. You shouldn't hear a sound, but some of you will hear a "thud" in your head every time the bouncing structure hits the ground.

A explain because it is Christopher Fassnidge of the University of London, according to whom the senses such as hearing and sight are crossed in the brain. In our discovery of the world, at all times we are surrounded by movements logically associated with sound: we see a ball bouncing and we expect to hear it bounce. As evidence suggests that so-called synaesthetic matings can be learned when we are small, according to Fassnidge, it makes sense that many people can develop synaesthesia for very common things. Other examples are a little more unusual. For example, pianist Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov perceived different musical notes as colors.

La synesthesia it is therefore what also happens with the "Noisy GIF" posted by Lisa DeBruine. According to Fassnidge it is a "visually evoked auditory response" or vEAR for short.

One of the recent studies by Fassnidge's laboratory suggests that up to 20% of people experience vEAR, a much higher percentage than other types of synaesthesia, affecting 2-4% of people.

It is possible that many of us have experienced the so-called vEAR without ever noticing it, because we think a sound is real when it is not, simply because it is plausible. And we may not notice it until we're subjected to noisy GIFs like this one.



Does anyone in visual perception know why you can hear this gif? pic.twitter.com/mcT22Lzfkp

- Lisa DeBruine? (@lisadebruine) 2 dicembre 2017

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What some people experience is therefore a real acoustic mirage. It is our brain that in a certain sense completes the image by associating the sound with it, leading us to hear a noise that is not there.



Francesca Mancuso

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